Endovascular Device Testing With Particle Image Velocimetry Enhances Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Education

  • Priya Nair School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Casey J Ankeny School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Justin Ryan School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281
  • Murat Okcay Interactive Flow Studies Corporation, Billings, MT 59102
  • David Frakes School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, and School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281
Keywords: particle image velocimetry, aneurysm, biofluid mechanics

Abstract

We investigated the use of a new system, HemoFlow, which utilizes state of the art technologies such as particle image velocimetry to test endovascular devices as part of an undergraduate biomedical engineering curriculum. Students deployed an endovascular stent into an anatomical model of a cerebral aneurysm and measured intraaneurysmal flow velocities with HemoFlow before and after. The measurements were used as a basis for teaching biofluid mechanical principles. A detailed survey-based evaluation was administered before and after the curriculum. The pre- and post-survey passed reliability testing with Cronbach’s alphas of 0.79 and 0.78, respectively. Further, the survey passed validity testing as questions testing the same latent variable factored together with weights all above 0.4. There was a statistically significant improvement in understanding according to a Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Our results indicate that using HemoFlow for endovascular device testing in an active learning-based curriculum improved student understanding of bio fluid mechanics.

Author Biographies

Priya Nair, School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281
Priya Nair is a doctoral candidate in Biomedical Engineering from the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University (ASU). She received her Bachelors degree in Biomedical Engineering from SSN Institutions (affiliated to Anna University), India. She joined the Image Processing Applications Laboratory at ASU in 2010 where she began her work on cerebral aneurysm hemodynamics. Ms. Nair is a graduate research associate and her research focus is on characterizing effects of cerebral aneurysm geometry on endovascular treatment outcome from a fluid dynamic point of view. Principal contact for editorial correspondence.
Casey J Ankeny, School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281
Casey J. Ankeny, PhD is lecturer in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering at Arizona State University. Casey received her bachelor’s degree in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Virginia in 2006 and her doctorate degree in Biomedical Engineering from Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University in 2012 where she studied shear- and side-dependent microRNAs in human aortic valvular endothelial cells. Currently, she is investigating cyber-based student engagement strategies with frequent, formative feedback in flipped and traditional biomedical engineering courses. She aspires to understand and improve student attitude, achievement, and persistence in student-centered courses.
Justin Ryan, School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281
Justin Ryan received his B.A. in digital art from Arizona State University’s (ASU) Herberger Institute for the Arts. In 2010, he joined the Image Processing Applications Laboratory within the School of Biological Health and Systems engineering at ASU to pursue a doctoral degree in Biomedical Engineering. Justin Ryan is a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship honorable mention (2011) and a Science Foundation Arizona Fellow. Mr. Ryan’s research focus includes novel visualization of anatomical systems and construction of physical anatomical analogues for surgical planning, education, and flow experimentation. Ryan currently runs the day-to-day operations of the 3D Cardiac Print Lab (3DCPL) at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, one of the first clinically-integrated 3D print labs in the nation. The 3DCPL has produced over 100 patient-specific hearts for surgical planning purposes.
Murat Okcay, Interactive Flow Studies Corporation, Billings, MT 59102
Murat Okcay obtained his Doctorate in Mechanical Engineering in 1993 from Bristol University, England. After several years as an assistant professor teaching fluid mechanics and heat transfer in the classroom and laboratories at the university, he joined Smiths Industries Plc designing Jet Fighters and has continually pushed the envelope in the field of fluid mechanics and heat transfer as a senior mechanical design engineer, publishing papers and filing patents. He was then recruited by Honeywell, in the US, during which time he completed his Master of Business Administration (MBA) at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Soon after that he moved to Minneapolis working at TSI responsible for sales and marketing of research grade PIV and LDV systems. After starting Interactive Flow Studies Dr. Okcay, as the Principal Investigator, won several highly competitive National Science Foundation (NSF) SBIR Phase I and Phase II grants. Dr. Okcay is also regularly asked by NSF to serve as a peer reviewer for the SBIR proposals.
David Frakes, School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, and School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85281
David Frakes received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering, the M.S. degree in mechanical engineering, and the Ph.D. degree in bioengineering, all from the Georgia Institute of Technology. In 2008 he joined the faculty at Arizona State University (ASU) where he currently serves as a jointly appointed associate professor in the School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering and the School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering. Dr. Frakes received the 2009 Arizona State University Centennial Professor of the Year Award, the 2012 National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and the 2013 ASU Faculty Achievement Award for Best Innovation. His general research interests include image and video processing, medical imaging, fluid dynamics, and machine vision. Dr. Frakes’ work is currently funded by Google, the American Heart Association, the National Science Foundation, and Mayo Clinic, among others. In 2013 he founded the company Endovantage, which focuses on simulating endovascular treatments and recently won the 2014 Arizona Commerce Authority Innovation Challenge.
Published
2016-09-15
Section
Articles